install theme
This week’s article pick:
Peterfreund S. Taste, Byron’s Cookbook, and the Secret Ingredients in the English Cantos of Don Juan. European Romantic Review [serial online]. December 2012;23(6):745-764. Available from: Literary Reference Center, Ipswich, MA. 
Abstract
The English cantos of Don Juan bring Byron’s satiric wit home to his own country and his own time. As a keen student of satire generally and of Augustan satire in particular, Byron appreciates the premise that satire works best when it is possible to historicize it by connecting the figures satirized with their real-life originals. Thus satire becomes a pseudo-history that rests on a humanistic history that illustrates the vanity and frailty of humanity. This essay takes as its starting point the menu of the banquet held by the Amundevilles in Canto 15 of the poem, traced some time ago to the menus of Louis Eustache Ude, author of The French Chef and a celebrated chef in England from before the Regency period to beyond it. Ude for some time worked as Lord Sefton’s chef, and the essay interrogates the similarities between the real-life Lord Sefton and Byron’s Lord Henry Amundeville, concluding that while Sefton provides much of the basis for Byron’s character, the rest of that basis is probably attributable to Sir William Lamb, Second Viscount of Melbourne, and the husband of Lady Caroline Lamb. This aspect of Lord Henry in turn gives way to the probability that Lady Adeline is at least in part based on Lady Caroline. The argument is supported by a close historical reading of the period and the lineages of the main characters of the English cantos.
Unless on site, use your library card number to access. Read more about our new discovery tool here.

This week’s article pick:

Peterfreund S. Taste, Byron’s Cookbook, and the Secret Ingredients in the English Cantos of Don Juan. European Romantic Review [serial online]. December 2012;23(6):745-764. Available from: Literary Reference Center, Ipswich, MA. 

Abstract

The English cantos of Don Juan bring Byron’s satiric wit home to his own country and his own time. As a keen student of satire generally and of Augustan satire in particular, Byron appreciates the premise that satire works best when it is possible to historicize it by connecting the figures satirized with their real-life originals. Thus satire becomes a pseudo-history that rests on a humanistic history that illustrates the vanity and frailty of humanity. This essay takes as its starting point the menu of the banquet held by the Amundevilles in Canto 15 of the poem, traced some time ago to the menus of Louis Eustache Ude, author of The French Chef and a celebrated chef in England from before the Regency period to beyond it. Ude for some time worked as Lord Sefton’s chef, and the essay interrogates the similarities between the real-life Lord Sefton and Byron’s Lord Henry Amundeville, concluding that while Sefton provides much of the basis for Byron’s character, the rest of that basis is probably attributable to Sir William Lamb, Second Viscount of Melbourne, and the husband of Lady Caroline Lamb. This aspect of Lord Henry in turn gives way to the probability that Lady Adeline is at least in part based on Lady Caroline. The argument is supported by a close historical reading of the period and the lineages of the main characters of the English cantos.

Unless on site, use your library card number to access. Read more about our new discovery tool here.

, #city of london libraries #city of london libraries online resources #literature #food #Byron

Here are last month’s top four audiobook downloads (Wolf Hall still on the number one spot).

If you’re a City of London Libraries patron, you can freely download both audiobooks and ebooks from us. Freeeeeely. For free, because library be like that (note to self: don’t do that again. Understood).

If you work or live in the City, do drop by to one of our libraries and pick up a membership card. You can join in person or online.

And then borrow things. For free. Library be like that (last time, promise).

, #city of london libraries #london #libraries #audiobook #downloads
This week’s article pick:
Engstrom E, Valenzano J. Demon Hunters and Hegemony: Portrayal of Religion on the CW’s Supernatural. Journal Of Media & Religion [serial online]. April 2010;9(2):67-83. Available from: Communication & Mass Media Complete, Ipswich, MA.
Abstract
The authors analyze the religious themes and portrayals in the television program Supernatural, aired on the CW television network since 2005. As fictional entertainment programming, Supernatural incorporates various religions and lore into its episodes, which feature its protagonists fighting monsters, demons, and the occasional evil human. Findings from a content analysis of 60 episodes from the first 3 seasons illustrate a religious hegemony that forwards Catholicism, in the form of weapons used to fight evil, such as holy water, and depictions of priests, as the main and most powerful opponent of evil. Non-Catholic, “other” religions, and their associated villainous characters, in contrast, serve as distractions for the protagonists, thus contributing even more to their marginal stature.
Unless on site, use your library card number to access. Read more about our new discovery tool here.

This week’s article pick:

Engstrom E, Valenzano J. Demon Hunters and Hegemony: Portrayal of Religion on the CW’s Supernatural. Journal Of Media & Religion [serial online]. April 2010;9(2):67-83. Available from: Communication & Mass Media Complete, Ipswich, MA.

Abstract

The authors analyze the religious themes and portrayals in the television program Supernatural, aired on the CW television network since 2005. As fictional entertainment programming, Supernatural incorporates various religions and lore into its episodes, which feature its protagonists fighting monsters, demons, and the occasional evil human. Findings from a content analysis of 60 episodes from the first 3 seasons illustrate a religious hegemony that forwards Catholicism, in the form of weapons used to fight evil, such as holy water, and depictions of priests, as the main and most powerful opponent of evil. Non-Catholic, “other” religions, and their associated villainous characters, in contrast, serve as distractions for the protagonists, thus contributing even more to their marginal stature.

Unless on site, use your library card number to access. Read more about our new discovery tool here.

, #city of london libraries #city of london libraries online resources #supernatural #religion
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